Dr. Neil Theise

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One World - Health Special

Dr. Neil Theise: Stem Cell Research

Professor Neil Theise is considered a pioneer of multi-organ stem cell research. His newest field of exploration centers on the nature and origin of consciousness, which he discusses at length with Dr. Deepak Chopra. If something is alive, it has a mind. If something has a mind, it’s at least a single-cell organism. Dr. Theise adds a significant voice to our world of stem cell research.

29:57 | 2013

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About Neil Theise

Neil Theise, MD is a diagnostic liver pathologist, adult stem cell researcher, and complexity theorist in New York City, where he is Professor of Pathology and of Medicine at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and attending physician at the Mount Sinai Beth Israel Medical Center. He received his BA in Oriental Studies (Judaica/Hebraica) and a BAS in Computer Science from University of Pennsylvania before earning his MD from Columbia University.

Dr. Theise's research revised understandings of human liver microanatomy which, in turn, led directly to identification of possible liver stem cell niches and adult stem cell plasticity. These remain active areas of scientific and clinical investigation.

Stirring complexity theory into this mix, he has extended his work to areas of theoretical biology and more fundamental questions regarding the underlying structure of the universe. His work with physicist Menas Kafatos points to three fundamental principles underlying the self-organizing universe: complementarity, sentience (or 'creative interactivity'), and recursion, evident in different forms at every level of scale. These features map directly to insights regarding the nature of reality from contemplative practices and philosophical inquiry from diverse cultures and spiritual perspectives.